Most tailors, in my experience, do not have great style. It was always thus: tailors were pushed by their customers, and one of the problems with modern tailoring is the lack of stylish and educated customers to encourage new cuts, materials and style. Perhaps in 10 years this generation of online enthusiasts will have grown up, and things will be different.

I do know some very stylish young tailors, however. This may be a generational thing, or it may be that many of these young guys eventually leave bespoke for some other part of the fashion industry. Either way, their enthusiasm for bespoke clothing is often matched by a love of readymade clothing. The overarching passion for style is rarely limited to one genre.

Their thoughts on designers or high-street brands are particularly interesting for being informed by bespoke, and as a result we often have tastes in common. This is the first in a series of short interviews with young tailors and cutters, on Savile Row and abroad, on their style. My hope is that it will be particularly useful for readers who always ask, ‘what do you wear at the weekend?’


Where do you work?
Chittleborough and Morgan. I’m a cutter and tailor and have been there four years.

How did you get into bespoke?
I wanted to try to create the best men’s garments in the world. So here we are (wink).

What do you like about Savile Row?
The fact that the cutting standards are highly maintained and are still superior to the rest of the world.

Describe your style, in terms of cut, cloth and colour
Jacket – closely cut all round (but not tight), structured foreparts, straight narrow shoulder line, deep vents, high gorges, sharp peak lapels.
Trousers – high waisted, narrow leg, wide bands and cuffs, small break at toe and none at the heel.
Shirt – cutaway collar, fly front, cuffs vary, slim tie with a small tight knot.

What’s your favourite style aspect of a suit?
Now because I do this for a living, I have quite a few favorites, but I always have to have slim sleeves.

What’s your favourite cloth and why?
Right now, cavalry twill. It tailors and shapes up like a dream. Dugdale, Holland and Sherry, Scabal, all do good versions.

What’s the favourite piece of tailoring you own?
My current favorite is my blue chalkstripe double-breasted suit

What tailoring are you going to make yourself next?
A knee-length pea coat in a black wool/cashmere. Three buttons’ high, double-breasted, detachable fur collar, sharp wide peaks, center pleat at the back and a bit of skirt.

What’s your favourite accessory?
My 1972 vintage Rolex Oyster Datejust

What do you wear at the weekend?
In the summer, plain-coloured fitted lightweight knits (merinos/silks) and tees, bespoke trousers (plain front, narrower leg, jodpur pockets) in linens and mohair mixes, lightweight double-breasted jacket and suede slip-ons. 

In winter I still wear lightweight knits (wools/cashmeres), trousers in the same style as above but in flannel, cavalry twill or moleskin, a fitted leather jacket or one of my overcoats, 100% cashmere scarves of course, and leather sneaker boots (Raf Simons/Common Projects).

What designer brands do you like, particularly for their cut or fit?
Burberry Prorsum: I possess two of the best tailored and softest calf leather jackets ever from them.
Acne: again well-tailored leathers and knits
Common Projects: leather sneakers I can wear with slim bespoke trousers without looking too sporty
John Smedley: they do a full buttoned-down polo shirt I absolutely adore and own in a couple of colours.

What high street brands do you like?
I love Zara for their plain, fitted, basic tees.

What’s top of your clothing wish list?
A soft leather bomber lined with sheep skin (Burberry Prorsum).

What blogs or websites do you read?
Permanent Style, The Sartorialist, The Italian Cut, Shoe Snob


[Photos: Luke Carby]