Navy jacket and jeans (with recommended cloths)

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A few readers asked in our recent Complete Capsule posts about the kind of navy jacket I mentioned, that would work with jeans as well as flannels. 

So I thought I’d shoot this example from Solito, which Luigi made me last year but which I've never covered. 

Readers will be familiar with the reasons it works with jeans, from a style point of view. 

It has a natural shoulder, without much padding and no roping - so the shoulder runs smoothly down into the sleeve. It is cut a little shorter than an English jacket would be, and is quite open in the foreparts - below the waist button. 

There are also style choices I made myself, in order to make it more casual: patch pockets, brown buttons, three buttons rolling to two.

The harder thing is the material, and this is what attracted most questions from readers. 

Navy is a great, versatile colour for a jacket, but being dark it is inherently smart. 

So it needs a rougher material and greater texture to make it casual. 

Having a pattern in the weave helps a lot with the texture: a herringbone is the most versatile - as shown here - but a pronounced twill or donegal also works.

The tricky thing to communicate to readers is what the fibre should be. Something like cashmere is too soft and shiny, and therefore smart. Tweed is the opposite: coarse, hairy, definitely casual. Which works with jeans, but some people don’t like its hairiness, or feel it is a little old-fashioned.

The truth is, there are lots of interesting options in between, but they can be hard to describe. Finer woollens? Softer tweeds? There’s no neat categorisation. 

 

Harrisons Moonbeam
W Bill Shetland
Moon lambswool twill

I spent a little time with the bunches at Steven Hitchcock recently, and here are a few I’d recommend. 

At the softer end of the spectrum is Moonbeam from Harrison’s. It’s 75% lambswool and 25% angora, and I had a lovely jacket made out of it by Steven a few years ago, in grey. It still feels luxurious, but without the sheen of cashmere. It just about works with jeans. There is a nice dark navy herringbone, 35015, 10/11oz. 

Another luxury option is camelhair, which isn’t as luxe as cashmere (or as expensive) but still feels lovely and soft. Like Moonbeam, I think it only just works with jeans. My favourite is 4/02, 330/350g, from Piacenza (Dunes bunch). 

Then there are the plain 'wools'. There is no easy way to describe these - most tailoring materials are wool after all. But these are woollens rather than worsteds, and definitely woven for jacketing. Loro Piana always has great options here, and I’d go for 667032, 370g - or 667019, 320g, which is bit more luxe as it's Super 170s and 6% cashmere. 

After that things get a little hairier. W Bill shetlands are really nice - much of the feeling of Harris Tweed, but not quite as coarse or scratchy. There is a herringbone - WB12124 - that is 12/13oz and just the right shade.

My favourite, though, of these more tweedy options is from Moon. A lambswool twill around 11oz, it has a lot of texture but is quite loose and open. It’s code is PL375 10/13. There are lots of other nice colours in there too, and Moon is always great value for money. 

My jacket was made in a Fox Brothers overcoating - lambswool, 20/21g, TW121 / A1440 / 12.

I wouldn’t recommend it for your one, versatile navy jacket though. The colour and weave are perfect, but it’s very heavy for a jacket, and a little denser and solid than most jacketings. 

Certainly unusual - a jacket with 'character' - but not the safest choice. 

The pictures also demonstrate how I wear a jacket with jeans, keeping everything simple and casual. 

So slightly tapered jeans, in a denim that, although dark indigo, has enough fading to separate it from the navy of the jacket. Anything from this to mid-blue would be fine. 

A light blue PS Oxford button-down shirt: casual in its material and in its style. And worn over a white T-shirt to be even more casual. With one extra button undone. Strong opinions on that, please, on this post

The shoes are unlined brown-suede Dovers from Edward Green. A nice halfway between smart and casual. Smart because it’s dark brown, in a slim last, with a small welt. Casual because it’s a split-toe and a derby, as well as being suede. 

It’s no coincidence that I was also wearing those shoes in my last piece on a jacket and jeans, here

That mid-brown colour of jacket is a lot easier to wear with jeans, as the colour is so much more casual than navy. It's cashmere: but such a hairy cashmere, with a big herringbone, that it works just fine.

For those that want more in this area, there’s also a good jacket-and-jeans post here. Again a brown jacket, but this time Harris Tweed. And boots that aren’t that different to the Dovers, being dark brown and slim, but in a casual leather. 

Brown-suede loafers would also have worked with any of these. 

Photography: Alex Natt @adnatt. Below, sneakily snapping me snapping more ironwork

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David C

when you say a jacket of this nature is slightly shorter than a typical English one, what is the length of this compared to say your Steven Hitchcocks?

zo

what about open weaves like hopsacks or basket weaves with jeans?
also does the same jacket above work with tailored trousers given shorter length?

Al

Interesting and useful article, as always. But a question: may I ask why do you wear a t shirt? From what I know one should never wear one under a dress shirt but I could be wrong.

E L

I think the t-shirt thing ruins the look. Normally, I am not so dogmatic about these things, but I find the t-shirt completely cheapens the look without adding anything to it.

On a separate note, I really like the jacket. I think there is something very satisfying about heavier jackets like this one.

Also, I think a white oxford or a striped oxford–red and white or yellow and white–would have been quite nice in this outfit.

Anonymous

Thanks Simon, going to read it. I’ve asked cause in my places ( Southern Italy) you see the combo suit or sport coat+dress shirt+t-shirt only worn by old men and almost never by young ones. When asked my old ones claim the t-shirt is a shield from cold in the winter and from sweat in the summer. But I am pretty sure the environment we live has a huge impact on such preferences too.

Anonymous

Widely worn in hot/humid climates to absorb sweat and save the shirt from becoming a mess.

BespokeNYC

Lovely tonal outfit. Any thoughts on lighter weight summer cloths? This is where I really struggle with jacket materials that work with jeans or chinos…

Alan

Simon, on the Dovers – chocolate or snuff suede?

Alan

Thanks Simon. In the market for these – yours are a 202 last and thin rubber sole? Deciding between yours or the 606 last, lined, leather sole in espresso suede. Any advice? Thank you very much.

Chad

Simon, is it technically possible to have a fused jacket “upgraded” to a canvased jacket by a local (alterations) tailor? Thank you!

Shoddy

Simon,
What do you think about heavy moleskin for a navy jacket? Also I think some merchants may do a navy Escorial- which I notice is not a colour you have included in the PS shop range.

JFF

Hi Simon.

The reason why I have avoided wearing jeans with jackets is that i’m afraid that the indigo dye (from the waistband) will transfer to the cloth of my shirt (and I dont really see the point in wearing a jacket without a shirt or even polo shirt underneath). Especially so with raw denim that’s expected to fade. I understand the charm of a faded and aged pear of jeans but for me, I dont want to risk my shirts or my jackets having denim “stains”. I don’t even like it when it jeans “stain” the uppers of my suede boots. Is there anyway around this? or should I have a dedicated set of shirts which I should be okay with having some indigo stains?

Thanks

JFF

Hi Simon, yes the problem is when I tuck my shirt into my jeans. Since I’ve avoided doing that, I haven’t really tried the jeans, shirt, and jacket outfit. Sorry, I realized I accidentally inserted the word “jacket” when I said “I dont want to risk my shirts or my jackets having denim stains” in my original comment. It was just my shirt which I was worried about.

Thank you for your response. I look forward to putting together a jeans, shirt, and jacket outfit!

Matt H

I have worn shirts tucked into dark indigo jeans many times with no dye transfer. I’m not sure if that would be the case if I got drenched by rain, though.

shem

Hi simon, wouldn’t a jacket like the games blazer by drake’s (https://www.drakes.com/navy-cotton-ripstop-games-blazer-mk-ii) be better be jeans? They seem to be casual enough for a lot of casual bottoms (jeans, wide chinos) but also smart enough for dress chinos. Can also be machine washed. Seems like a good versatile choice for a more dress downed WFH world

shem

Hi simon, on the topic of jackets I’ve been toying with the idea of getting my first double breasted sports coat to wear in slightly colder countries during overseas trips (after COVID19). I intend to wear them casual, with chinos (smart to army wide ones) and denim. There are 3 i’m considering:
1) An unstructured one in navy like this, worn with a turtleneck perhaps (https://www.drakes.com/clothing/blazers/navy-irish-linen-games-blazer-mk-iii)
2) A traditional soft shouldered one but in olive (https://shop.ringjacket.com/products/olive-balloon-db-blazer)
3) A straight up traditional one in navy (https://shop.ringjacket.com/products/navy-balloon-db-club-blazer)

For a novice and someone who has never owned a DB, are there recommendations as to one which I should get?

Anonymous

I have a bespoke blue blaser made from H+S mesh, with the lightest of canvasses and very soft shoulders. When I wear it with a white OCBD, distressed faded blue jeans and snuff loafers, I get more compliments, often from total strangers, than I do when wearing any other combinations from my bespoke wardrobe.

Ira Casel

I️ have a navy blazer that I’ve been thinking of making more casual by changing the brass buttons to brown horn, but am a bit stuck on choosing the right ones. Can you offer any guidelines of photos of the buttons you have on this jacket? Thanks.

DB

Interesting post, Simon. I’m not sure the outfit pictured here quite works for me, though. I can’t put my finger on it, but I think the jacket is reading like a flannel for me, at least in the zoomed out shots, and I don’t think of that as a usual choice for odd jackets.

The suede Dovers do look great with this kind of outfit.

DB

This may well be a situation where the pictures don’t quite convey the impression that one would get in person. I think it’s tough to fully capture texture and pattern with a dark fabric like this.

The cut of the jacket is very nice. It’s a good example of a soft, casual look that still retains the elegance of a tailored silhouette.

Nick

Ha! Had a db jacket made from the same cloth by W&S. Absolutely love the weight of it, it feels so reassuring and can essentially substitute a coat or act as a great layer under a lighter waterproof. Of course I agree it is not the most versatile piece. Anglo-Italian have a navy linen herringbone in 16 oz which looks nice. That being said do you think the weight would make it less wearable in the summer though?

Akb

Hello Simon a big fan of yours here, will just like to know who the jeans maker is? hard to find your kind of jeans out there nowadays.

Anonymous

In the pictures on the site you seem to wear your Solito jackets unbuttoned most of the time. Is there a reason for that (e.g., the waist is cut slim), or is that just a coincidence?

Otávio Silva

I think you meant “20/21oz” rather than “20/21g”.

A question: if this jacket was completely unstructured, would it make any difference on the feel and drape, given how heavy the fabric is?

Great article as always.

Andrew

Hey Simon – there are also some lovely navy blue harris tweeds out there. Any reason you didn’t pick something like that?

Rogey

I have had three jackets made up from the W. Bill Shetland bunch, including one that was called Vintage Shetland, and the cloth is fantastic, with beautiful patterns, colors, and textures. It has gotten to the point where I have to tell myself to get something from another book. One of your readers asked about a navy moleskin jacket and you expressed a preference for other cloths. Fair enough. I would mention that I got an olive moleskin jacket made, with dark brown horn buttons, hacking pockets, and a sort of autumn red lining, and I love it.

Justin

Even though this is a lighter italian construction, would you go fully lined with a jacket this heavy (and/or one slightly hairy that may catch on shirts more)? Thanks.

RolleFC

It’s a nice jacket, but IMO it does not work well to the jeans; too dark, too similar in color. Would need mid or light blue jeans. The brown jacket/dark denim combo in the other post is so much better.

Andreas

I really like the sport coat/denim/suede combo in theory, but I rarely end up wearing it, because I find the shirt (or more precisely, the area where the shirt meets the pants) to be problematic. When worn with a pair of woolen pants or chinos, you probably wouldn’t wear a belt, but on denim that isn’t really an option, and the combination of a sport coat with a belted (and often low-waisted) pair of jeans can easily end up looking sloppy. I’m not trying to be mean here, and I realize you were going for a casual-yet-elegant vibe, but while the coat and shoes in these pictures look great, the denim pants pose, in my opinion, an unnecessary weak point in an otherwise lovely outfit.

Dan

I’d agree on the Moon recommendation – I had a jacket made up in the Dark Brown Mix Lambswool Twill (https://www.moons.co.uk/product/dark-brown-mix/) that turned out beautifully and wears well with jeans, and is less hairy/spongy than other tweeds.

For other “woolens with texture” I think the range of solid twills in Fox’s Somerset Jacketing bunch look great. I’m getting a jacket made up in the Dark Olive Twill but they also carry a navy (on the brighter side, not quite true navy): https://themerchantfox.co.uk/products/navy-twill-jacketing

Jason

For a summer alternative with jeans, I would heartily recommend Anglo-Italian’s tennis blazer in navy blue linen. It’s louche styling is perfect for wearing with a polo or Tee .
In winter I resurrect an old navy Zegna MTM which I had made 15 years ago in a 98%/2% cashmere/silk mix with a herringbone pattern. I’ve had the buttons changed to a brown horn. It is a superb cloth and has really stood the test of time. I think the silk makes all the difference and gives the cashmere more texture and makes it more durable. I don’t know if you’ve experienced this mix Simon ?
Certainly this look is a must for any thinking flaneurs wardrobe.

Miles

Do you ever wear your St. Crispins Brown Suede Chukka boots with jeans and a jacket? Or is the last too elegant?

Alternatively, do you think a shanklin in dark brown would work, being more rounded and causal?

As always, asking for a friend…

CW

Hi Simon, would a double breasted jacket made in the navy Moonbeam you suggested work equally well with jeans compared to single breasted? Thanks.

Karol

In my opinion talking about fabrics gets much harder when we get into mixes. Style of a single type of fabric can be fairly consistant. But mixes can go in weird directions. I think you once mentioned that wool/silk/linens can look very different, regardless of how much percent of silk or linen is in there. It can get weird. I found a grey 50/50 herringbone silk/cashmere in a casual cut. I wouldn’t mind if it had a bit less shine, but it seems to work with denim well enough.

Kenny

Teba jackets, a cross between a cardigan and shooting jacket, are ideal with jeans in town. They are very comfortable and can look smart with flannel trousers and loafers. Olive is a flexible alternative to navy.

Oliver Brown has several RTW Tebas (in wool, tweeds and linen) at around £400 to £450. J Girdwood offers MTO from Justo Gimeno in Zaragoza that can be ordered from the PS pop-up shops. They are also available more cheaply in Spanish menswear stores. I picked up a couple of bargains in Andalucia last year.

It’s a bit surprising that no one else has mentioned this comfortable and great value alternative.

hannes

had to look twice in the last pic to be sure it’s not a selfie of the top of your skull 😉

Fredrik

Such a wonderful jacket. In your opinion, would this fabric still work with jeans if done in the fairly wide shouldered Prolouge cut?

Jay Weir

Thank you Simon. Loved the swatches. Prior to reading this, I would have gone for my pea coat with jeans, given the weather. However, your jacket steps things up quite nicely from that- looks like I need to spend some money on a new jacket.

M.E.

I am interested in having a jacket made up like this.

Do you think the The Armoury’s Model 3 would work for this kind of look, provided it is made up in the right cloth ? Or would the shape (particularly thinking of the extended shoulders) not go well with more casual trousers or jeans ?

Matt H

This outfit definitely works well (I can’t fathom the thought process of anyone who says otherwise, to be honest). It’s a pity you didn’t include at least one picture with the jacket buttoned.

I have a very similar jacket by Orazio Luciano which, although cashmere, doesn’t look or feel particularly like cashmere and works well in this kind of outfit.

CMW

Hi Simon. Would the Dark Navy Moonbeam be a good choice for a somewhat smart navy blazer? One that would go well with grey flannel trousers and grenadine ties?

CMW

Would the Moon lambswool twill be a better choice to pair with grey flannel trousers?
I like how in this article you are looking at this in-between area, between smart (cashmere) and casual (tweed).
I am going for my first navy blazer which I don’t want to be too casual, which is why I like the darker navy color. But I was never sure about what type of fabric or pattern to get. So thanks for this article as it is giving me some great options to think about.

george rau

I much prefer a brown tweed with jeans. I have a green and tan glen plaid jacket in shetland wool that is very country and works perfectly with jeans. I will wear a blue linen or cotton jacket with off white jeans. Blue jacket with blue jeans is a look you see all over in the states, it looks like an insurance salesman trying to be cool

Stephen

A very interesting and informative article. I have liked wearing jackets with jeans for some time, especially since my retirement, as many of my interactions are less formal. For me this is most useful when slightly upgrading a more casual look. For a number of reasons this look has historically had a bad press and this article has given it a respectability by (as with many things) thinking it through especially in getting the material and jacket style right. I have a navy jersey herringbone jacket and gun check Harris Tweed from Drake’s both of which I think work well with jeans, as does a Fox Flannel check, all of which are soft shouldered, with patch pockets and unstructured. Drakes are a good place in my opinion to pick up RTW jackets for this look as you will see from the ideas they put together on their website. On the subject of T Shirts, it’s really personal choice and what you feel looks right for your own style. I just find they feel a little bulky, so when I occasionally wear one I go for one with a slight stretch. One final point is that I feel jackets with jeans really come into their own when worn with a roll neck sweater. This is very versatile as you can go from merino in the fall, through cashmere in the winter and even on occasion a slightly more chunky wool with Harris Tweed in place of an overcoat (but only in an English type milder winter).
Simon would you be able to do something on your thoughts for roll next sweaters with jackets at some point please.
Thanks again for another article that adds to our knowledge..

Matt F

So Simon, all in all, how did Solito do? I’m a big fan and will use them again, you must be too to use them again?

Carl

I have a neapolitan sport coat made by Saman Amel in navy Loro Piana Cashmere Wish (Super 100 + some cashmere). It has brown buttons and patch pockets. I have usually just used it with flannels and cavalry twill. Do you think it would also work with indigo denim? (If there is some contrast in the colors).

Haackk

Hi!

Do you think the Ring Jacket 184FOL Navy Wool Twill Sport Coat (NOS), which you recommended om Drop93 will have enough texture to work with jeans? Hard to tell from the pictures.

Adam N

I have a Drake’s jacket in navy herringbone jersey which does the trick too.

Stephen

Hi Simon, for roll necks with jackets, yes mainly weight and colour of roll neck, as part of overall styling with types of jackets and jeans/trousers. Essentially similar to recent article and others where you cover the type of cloth and style that works when wearing a roll neck. Thanks again.

JB

I’ve considered making a jacket from overcoat cloth a bunch of times, as they’re usually very nice, but what’s held me back is worry it would be very warm. Obviously it’s for fall and winter, but have you found it too warm to wear as much as other jackets?

Dan

This a great, classic ensemble. And what jeans are you wearing? I did not see the brand mentioned in the article. Also, are you not wearing a pocket square to keep it casual?

Ivan

Simon, what do you think of comparing a good rtm sport coat (e.g. Ring Jacket) against a mid-tier mtm one? I’m thinking which route should I go for??

DD

That’s a very interesting comment about getting better quality with RTW as compared to MTM at the same price. Can i ask you to elaborate why you expect the quality would be better in the MTM case please?

DD

Sorry, typo, meant why would you expect RTW to have better quality. One would have thought MTM would be better in terms of both quality and fit?

Having said that, this (wrong?) expectation by me is probably what left me a bit confused with MTM, when i saw that it fit better, but the RTW had nicer trappings

DD

Of course. On your comment above you spoke of RTW and MTM of the same price; am referring to that scenario. Why in that case woud you expect the quality of RTW to be better than MTM?

DD

Understood, thanks!

Tim

I’ve had a few Navy jackets over the years. Inevitably they all ended up being worn with jeans at some point. Undoubtedly my favourite was a nice mid-weight hopsack. It also had natural brown buttons.

Anon

Hi Simon,

Thanks for another informative post. You often note (as here) that for a jacket to work with jeans, it ought to be soft shouldered, unstructured, etc.

However, two quick questions on this:
(1) To what extent do you consider the determining factor in this to be cloth vs cut/style of the jacket?
(2) Without necessarily comparing extremes in style, would you be able to demonstrate why a more structured jacket wouldn’t work with jeans (even if in the right cloth), e.g., by comparing above the outfit to a similar one but with, say, a Steven Hitchcock / A&S / other jacket?

Miles

One correction here for anyone wondering: I believe the W. Bill Shetland Bunch is WB12123!

The WB 12124 also looks lovely, but is mid grey with blue in it.

Anonymous

Going off the w.bill website photos. My mistake and thanks.

Michael R.

Dear Simon,
The Neapolitan tailors tend to do a notch that is higher on the coat, don’t they? I am 6 4’ and don’t really think I need to appear taller. I dislike how the notch on my jackets sits as essentially most people look at me from below and the notch appears very very high. It might be useful if you comment how we should estimate the position of the notch as I can only judge it once the jacket has been made up and have worn it a couple of times and have had pictures taken.
Best
Michael

Jonny

Really helpful article. I think it’s definitely channeling the zeitgeist of where a lot of us are, both in terms of the smart-casual element in modern times, but also because a versatile navy jacket could be one of the pieces at the forefront of the ‘buy less, but buy better’ mentality that I’m hoping is prevailing more and more.

I looked at several of the cloths you’ve mentioned here and think I’m going to go for a Navy Moonbeam jacket. I’m just struggling to pick between the Herringbone featured in the article (35015), and the twill in the same shade (35020). I figure there’s very little in it since the herringbone is very subtle, but I wondered if you had any insight or wisdom before I end up tossing a coin to decide!

Dan

Hi Simon – what would you think of these options for someone living in a mild/temperate climate?
1. Fox Midnight Serge – 18/19 oz – maybe a bit heavy but has some interesting surface texture and a noticeable twill weave. The matte finish is particularly appealing.(https://themerchantfox.co.uk/products/fox-midnight-serge-jacketing)
2. Dugdale Cascade Silk/Linen Barleycorn – 9.1 oz – some nice texture, almost has a knit appearance, not sure about any sheen it might have. (https://shop.dugdalebros.com/cascade/product/7634-navy-blue-plain/colour/navy_blue_plain/page/123/)

Dan

Thanks, Simon!

Richard

Simon, I have an appointment with a tailor next week as I am looking to commission a navy sport coat. Something that will not look out of place with pale or mid grey fox flannels, cotton chinos or even indigo jeans.

It would be a spring and autumn piece.

While he has various samples, he is open to ordering cloth if I have a particular request.

Do you think Harrison’s Moonbeam dark navy herringbone, 35015 would be appropriate? Can you point me to other cloth to research?

Alexander

Thank you for this important article! It made me think about my own wardrobe a lot in the last weeks.
About flannel for jackets: I wear my navy flannel jacket (soft shoulder, three patch pockets etc.) with jeans, chinos and also with grey flannels. It never accured to me that this could be odd.
Simon, you would consider all three combinations a miss-match, am I wright? If I got it right, this is mainly because of the lack of texture and that a flannel jacket will somehow always look like a part of a suit and too formal for seperate wear?
Thanks for the clarification!

Richard

If the flannel for the jacket was swapped for say serge/twill or even Harrisons Moonbeam, ceteris paribus, could that be paired with grey flannel as well as jeans?

Hugh

Hi Simon,
Interested in how you’d compare these borderline cloths that can be just about worn with jeans in other cuts- do you think they’d work in a more trad neapolitan cut, or a British drape?

John

Hi Simon, i have a question regarding the premise that a navy jacket is the most important first jacket to have when building a wardrobe: would a patterned dark brown not be even more versatile? Such as your herringbone jacket here: https://www.permanentstyle.com/2018/09/jacket-and-jeans-vintage-cashmere-from-eduardo-de-simone.html

Dark brown goes with grey flannels, jeans and chinos in cream or olive, without the work-around discussed here in terms of matching with jeans. The caveat would be that a dark brown is more casual than navy. However, many of us no longer require the formality of dressing once required, and wearing a jacket at all is a step up in formality, above the majority. Also, it seems a versatile navy jacket is, by its very nature, not the most exciting, in terms of pattern or texture.

This cloth from AI seems to fit the bill, as an easy to find example:
https://angloitalian.com/collections/tessuti/products/ait-072

My question then: if the drop in formality that a patterned dark brown brings is not an issue, is it not even more versatile than navy?

Interested to know your thoughts, and many thanks.

Anonymous

Would the Moon lambswool twill PL375 10/13 be a good cloth for unstructured jackets, like your former post?
I’m deciding whether to go for an odd jacket or unstructured jacket in navy since my environment is super casual…any tips for preference?

Anonymous

Why do you think the Moon PL375 10/13 lambswool be better in an odd jacket as opposed to a casual unstructured jacket one?

Is it because the cloth looks more suited for odd jacketing? Or because it’s kind of tweedy and would feel uncomfortable in an unstructured, mostly unlined jacket? Out of curiosity… thank you!

Anonymous

When will the neutral square scarf be back Simon? Thanks

Andras

Hi Simon,
Just received samples from Moon, and you are right, that navy is great, planing to have soft jacket with patch pockets, can you please advise me, should I go patch with breast pocket as well, or is it to much? Thanks for your work and your advice.

Anonymous

Regardless of whether you would wear it, is it possible to pull off a navy jacket in an english cut (like Steven Hitchcock) with jeans? So I am interested if you just don’t like english jackets with casual trousers or if it is a general faux pas to combine them.

Il Pennacchio

Could five-pocket pants (ie trousers cut like jeans from fabrics like corduroy, moleskin, or a chino twill) be matched with a jacket made from a less casual fabric than one would wear with denim jeans?

Tim

Simon (and anyone else), what are your thoughts on a navy sports coat in corduroy? I feel like it would be a nice mix of the formality of navy and the casualness of corduroy, especially in a well-tailored jacket… But I also feel like corduroy works better as trousers. I’m afraid it will be a waste of money, and something like the Moonbeam would be a better bet.

Tim

Thanks, Simon. I think I will go with the Moonbeam… I’ve been wanting to make something up from that bunch for a while, and while it’s tempting to do something a bit loud (the green with blue windowpane, 35002) or the gun club check (35042), I’ll probably go with the navy herringbone (35015).

Speaking of olive jackets, I’m in the process of having your olive escorial fabric made up as a jacket now (along with the oatmeal.) My tailor is a fan of it, and it’s coming along great. They’re a bit sharper and more urban than brown sports coats, which is what I was hoping for.

Paul F.

What are your thoughts on pairing Fox Brothers’ Somerset jacketing cloths with denim/jeans, specifically, in light of this post, either the navy twill (FJ350-B2692/45) or navy herringbone (FJ350-B2693/54)? My concern is whether either would still be casual enough to pair with denim and have sufficient textural contrast to work. Of course, whether either works could also depend entirely on the style and cut of the jacket.

For some reason, the Moon & Sons website won’t allow me to register an account outside the UK, which prohibits me from ordering from them. (No idea why this is.) So I’m looking for options on sites that will actually allow me to order their cloth as a customer not in the trade. Anglo-Italian has a couple options as well, including their half wool, half cotton navy twill (AIT – 069), but again, in terms of your recommendations, I’m not sure if this is fuzzy or hairy enough to add sufficient textural contrast to work with denim.

Paul F.

I don’t want to speak for the tailor necessarily, but he has a small shop abroad and likely also doesn’t have an account with Moon. His cloth selection is small and seemed more geared toward conservative worsteds, which is likely what most of his clients are after. For him, I’m almost certainly the outlier in trying to find a suitable navy jacketing material that would also work with denim.

Partially out of frustration at (so far) being unable to purchase one of your recommended cloths for a navy jacket, I went ahead and ordered the PS Escorial tweed in green. Not only had I been toying with the idea of this cloth for a while–despite its price–but I can actually buy a length of it online.

Of course, this still leaves me searching for a versatile navy jacketing cloth. Thanks for your thoughts on the Anglo-Italian option. On that front, I was also considering their winter hopsack (AIT – 001) and this navy-black twill (AIT – 034). I realize that hopsack is a plain weave cloth, and so may not have the desired visual interest that a twill would, but thought it could work with denim if it’s as “fuzzy and soft” as it’s described. I feel like the latter navy-black twill option would work with denim, but at 490 gms, it seems heavier than I’d like my jacket cloth to be. Alas, I’m not in London, so I can’t visit Anglo-Italian to see these cloths in person, but I’d appreciate any follow-up thoughts on my thinking. Thanks!

Rob

The Dovers are lovely. But do you think that you miss out a little having Dovers in suede – you seem to miss out on that wonderful stitching you get with the leather equivalents. But maybe they are less versatile?

Anonymous

Is a jacket made of moonbeams (or other fabrics you recommended above) wearable in the English summer (e.g. in the evening) or does it look too “warm” to be worn in summer (like tweed)?

Anonymous

Up to what temperature can you wear fabrics like Moonbeam or the two recommended from Loro Piana?

Alexander

Hopefully an appropriate thread to ask this – do you believe that the G&G Wallis is as versatile as the Edward Green Banbury? Is it casual enough for most situations with jeans?

I was thinking of this model in mole suede (a dark brown suede) but was curious about your thoughts. https://www.gazianogirling.com/products/wallis-in-polo-suede-r18/

Alexander

Given that slimness do you think it still works as well with jeans and very casual outfits? Basically you think it works in the same situations?

Anonymous

Alexander, I have both the EG Banbury and the GG Wallis. There is a very small difference in last shape, as Simon correctly deduced from the pictures, but they are functionally equivalent in my view.

Aaron Daniels

Would you say this PW WFA blazer would fit the bill, and do you think it could also be dressed up a bit, even if not with flannels and a tie?

https://www.privatewhitevc.com/products/the-wfa-blazer?variant=32889633275965

VincentL.

Hi Simon,

What do you think of this Loro Piana fabric ? (https://ibb.co/02ZZM0t)
Too big herringbone ? It’s hard to find the good one because it’s my first jacket.

VincentL

Last question, do you think dark navy herringbone jacket is great to go to theater like Opera Garnier ? I hesitate with something like your Steven Hitchcock Blazer, but it’s less versatile I guess.
Going to theater without looking too formal, it’s not easy to find out, especially when we are still young.

Maybe dark blue navy herringbone can look smart with a beige chino or a grey flannel from Berg & Berg ? (All my trousers are from them thanks to you !)

Max

Simon thank you for your guidance, I have gone for the Abraham Moon cloth in a 3 roll 2, slanted pockets and a soft shoulder pad.

Would your advice be to keep the lining to a deep blue too, and its hard to tell from the photos but it looks as though you have gone for dark brown buttons. 4 on the cuff?

Paul F.

Hi Simon! Any chance you’re familiar with the Bateman lambswool twill bunch? They have a dark navy (4232) that I’ve been considering for a jacket. Just wondering if it would be too smart to wear with jeans. Appreciate any thoughts you have. Thanks!

Jake

Hey Simon

Sorry for commenting on an older post but curious on camel hair. You have any articles or could you tell me your opinion on it? The Brycelands guys love their camel jackets and they look so good. Great texture and not to much shine. Loved the swatch you linked, you really think it be a good versatile jacket?

Haackk

Hi, Simon. Lovely jacket.

Woulf you mind sharing some measurements of the jacket?

I.e. length of shoulder seam, pit to pit, half waist and back length?

Thanks

Haackk

Hi and thanks. I thought the cut was a little different from that jacket, but thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

Still, if you have any photos of yourself posing in the navy Solito jacket like you do in your Style breakdown-posts, I would greatly appreciate if you could post them. I see you have many photos of it while moving, but it would be great to see it in a more posed manner.

Thanks